Dark chocolate with cocoa on wooden table

Dark chocolate is good for your teeth.

We love dark chocolate. Whether it’s Valentine’s Day, Halloween or just an ordinary Tuesday, it seems to make everything better. But dark chocolate doesn’t just make us happy because it tastes great.

This delicious treat is one of the most complex foods we know and contains over 300 natural chemicals, including one called phenylethylamine, which arouses similar feelings to those we feel while we’re in love.

So when we say we love dark chocolate, it’s because we really might be in love with it!

Is dark chocolate healthy?

Short answer: Absolutely.

Dark chocolate is an antioxidant-rich superfood. It can improve your mood, reduce your risk of heart disease and may even help prevent cancer.

Dark chocolate may even make you smarter. One study found that eating dark chocolate every day can increase blood flow to your brain and help with cognitive thinking as you age. And we like any study that encourages us to eat more chocolate!

The best news of all, though, is that dark chocolate can help you lose weight, as long as you only eat 1-2 ounces, or 6-8 grams, each day.

So I can eat half a bar of dark chocolate every day?

We think you should talk that one over with your family doctor first. But according to everything we can find, it is perfectly healthy to eat raw cacao nibs, 1-2 ounces of an organic dark chocolate, or even half a dark chocolate candy bar you’d find at a gas station every day.

As always, we recommend you floss after and rinse with mouthwash – just to keep your smile free of leftover sugars that can stick to your teeth.

Is dark chocolate better than fluoride?

New studies show that dark chocolate is effective at fighting cavities, plaque and tooth decay.

Dark chocolate is a good source of polyphenols, natural chemicals that can limit oral bacteria. They are also able to neutralize microorganisms that cause bad breath and prevent some bacteria from turning sugar and starches into acid, which love to wreck havoc on your teeth.

Antioxidants in dark chocolate have been shown to fight periodontal disease. And research suggests it might be better at fighting tooth decay than fluoride. There’s also a compound found in chocolate called CBH that could be used in mouthwashes and toothpaste someday.

Does that mean I can brush my teeth with chocolate?

Please don’t.

Is milk chocolate good for my teeth?

Short answer: No.

If you’re used to eating milk chocolate or other artificial chocolates, it’s time to put your foot down and shout, “It’s dark or nothing!” Because in reality, it’s cacao that has so many benefits, and dark chocolate is 70% cacao.

Milk chocolate contains milk and extra sugar to add sweetness and lower the cost of production. So some bars of milk chocolate contain as little as only 10% cacao.

So let’s stick to the real thing. You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg to find a bar of chocolate with around 70% cacao. And enjoy your new nightly tradition. And why not join us as we say it just one more time…

WE LOVE DARK CHOCOLATE!

Man looking through a magnifying glass

Bleachorexia & The Quest For Whiter Teeth

Teeth whitening is a billion-dollar industry. In 2016 alone, Americans spent more than $1.4 billion on over-the-counter teeth whitening products. And with the never-ending deluge of ‘grams, snaps and tabloids reminding us that our Hollywood idols have impossibly white smiles, this trend isn’t going anywhere. Some dentists have even taken to giving the obsessive quest for whiter teeth its own name – Bleachorexia.

History of Teeth Whitening

Even though whitening strips and bleach trays have only been around for 30 years, the quest for whiter teeth has been going on for millennia. In ancient Egypt, white teeth were a sign of wealth so they’d use twigs to apply a paste of wine vinegar and ground pumice stone to their teeth. Think that sounds gross? The Romans used urine to whiten theirs! In the Middle Ages, barbers acted as surgeons and dentists too, and they’d actually file teeth down before putting nitric acid on them!

Thankfully those days are behind us. Since the 1980s, dentists have been perfecting the art of whitening teeth with in-office whitening treatments and take-home whitening gels. But patients are often concerned with the cost of these treatments and will turn to inexpensive, over-the-counter alternatives which unfortunately—without the expert advice of a dentist or hygienist—can lead to some unintended dental disasters.

Dangers of Over-the-Counter Teeth Whitening

The problem with over-the-counter bleaching products is that they are not regulated by the FDA, and many people will leave trays on too long or use them too often. Using bleaching trays too often really does more harm than good because over-bleaching can remove the protective layer of your teeth called enamel. Ironically enough, teeth with less enamel are not only weaker and prone to tooth decay – they will also appear more yellow in color!

Bleaching fears are why many people turn to whitening toothpaste which—like all toothpastes—is abrasive. Toothpaste abrasiveness can be measured by its relative dentin abrasion (RDA) value, but these values are rarely printed on packaging. We always recommend talking to your dentist about which toothpaste is right for your teeth, but if you’re curious about the RDA of your favorite brand, there are many charts available online. The common belief is that toothpastes under 150 RDA are best for your teeth.

Remember that whitening products can make teeth more sensitive, as well as harm gum tissue, tooth nerves, and tooth pulp which can result in mild discomfort or severe pain. If you notice after home treatments that you have bleeding gums, extra sensitivity or discoloration, your best bet is to stop immediately and schedule a checkup with your dentist. Experts say the negative effects can be reversed, but sometimes caps and veneers will be needed to protect over-bleached teeth.

Teeth Whitening Tips

Teeth whitening, especially in-office whitening or at-home whitening gel, is very safe and effective in moderation. And our practices offer a variety of payment options to help you achieve the smile of your dreams. If you’re ready to whiten, we’ve got some tips that will help you do it right.

  1. Consult your dentist first. We understand that teeth whitening gum or inexpensive, store-bought bleaching trays might be easier on your bank account than a trip to the dentist. But in-office teeth whitening or at-home whitening gels are much safer and more effective than anything you can buy at the store. The whitening gel used by dentists is designed to absorb into teeth on the microscopic level through your naturally porous enamel layer and be retained by the tooth at the level of the dentin, where the actual color of the tooth is determined. Home kits don’t follow the same process,  and their active ingredients are generally combinations of hydrogen peroxide and/or varieties of bleach (to chemically remove stains and whiten the enamel) or abrasive pastes (to grind the stained layer of enamel off the tooth).
  2. Wait 6 months between treatments. As we’ve said, excessive brushing and over-bleaching can remove enamel and hurt your teeth over time. If you choose to use over-the-counter whitening products, please follow directions and consult your dentist about which products are best for you.
  3. Buy brand names you can trust and be skeptical of home remedies. Remember the old adage, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” Crest, Colgate and other big names in oral care have been doing this a long time whereas bloggers and online retailers have less of an obligation to protect consumers. Use your best judgment and at least talk to your dentist before trying popular DIY whitening ideas like coconut oil pulling, brushing with hydrogen peroxide or rubbing apple cider vinegar on your teeth.
  4. Take care of your overall health. Acidic foods like pickles and citrus fruits can wear down enamel. And an unhealthy diet can contribute to unhealthy teeth and gums. So if you’re interested in a brighter smile, invest some time in your overall health. Drink water. Don’t smoke. Get some exercise. And don’t forget to floss. Because—believe it or not—flossing cleans more surface area of your teeth than brushing does.
  5. Invest in an electric toothbrush (and a water flosser too). For best results, we recommend you take the leap into the 21st century and invest in an electric toothbrush and water flosser, which have both been shown to improve oral health. Our practices recommend Sonicare toothbrushes and WaterPik flossers, and we offer discounts to our patients. All you have to do is ask!
Diabetes pen nib pointing to the words in the dictionary, shot with very shallow depth of field,

Diabetes and Oral Health

Diabetes can cause serious tooth and gum problems. 

Diabetes affects 1 in 10 people in the United States and can lead to vision loss, kidney damage, high blood pressure and problems with feet and hands. People with diabetes are also far more at risk for periodontal disease than the general population, and experience almost 3 times the rate of tooth and gum problems. Research suggests that diabetes is the primary systemic risk factor for periodontal disease.

People with diabetes are often aware of the importance of podiatric (foot) and opthalmic (vision) screenings, but many do not realize the two-way relationship between oral health and diabetes. Tooth loss, for example, is up to two times more frequent in people with diabetes than non-diabetics. Periodontal disease can affect insulin sensitivity, lead to unhealthy blood sugar levels and damage the bone and gum that hold your teeth in place.

So if you have diabetes, paying special attention to your oral health can not only improve your quality of life and overall health, but it can also save you money. Statistics show that receiving dental care reduces average medical costs by about $2800 per year.

Dental Tips for People with Diabetes

The good news is that you can keep your teeth and gums healthy. By following our simple tips, you can help prevent some serious problems in your mouth.

  1. Take control of your blood glucose. Develop a healthy eating plan and get regular exercise if you’re able. Try to eat consistently. Focus your attention on carbs, portion control, and eating lots of fiber and non-starchy vegetables.
  2. Brush, floss, rinse and chew. We call these the Daily 4. Brush your teeth for two minutes two times daily. Floss your teeth before bed. Rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash after meals. And chew gum to help your mouth produce helpful bacteria that attack plaque.
  3. Visit your dentist for routine checkups. Consider all the medical professionals in your life a kind of health management team. Start a conversation with your dentist about your diabetes and any symptoms you’re experiencing. Speak with your doctor about your oral health. Remember that health is holistic and there are many connections between your oral health and the rest of your body.
  4. Quit smoking. You can watch one of those ads here.If you’re still smoking, it’s time to stop. We know it’s difficult, but the evidence against smoking is inarguable. In fact, a federal court has ordered all major tobacco companies to begin running advertising over the next year that admits they made cigarettes more addictive and lied about the health risks associated with smoking.
  5. Talk with a diabetes educator. If you’re worried you’re not doing the best you can to manage your diabetes, you might want to consider meeting with a diabetes educator. As a member of your healthcare team, a diabetes educator makes managing your diabetes easier. They work with you to develop a plan to stay healthy, and give you the tools and ongoing support to make that plan a regular part of your life. You can find a diabetes educator near you at diabeteseducator.org.

Symptoms of Gum Disease, Gingivitis and Periodontitis

Since gum disease is often painless, you may not even know you have it until it becomes serious.

So if you have diabetes and want to monitor your oral health for the best results, watch out for the following symptoms. If you think you are experiencing any of these, schedule a conversation with your dentist to evaluate your gum health. Your problems may only be minor, but

  1. Swollen or tender gums
  2. Gums that easily bleed while brushing and flossing
  3. Receding gum line
  4. Difficulty chewing
  5. Chronic bad breath or bad taste in your mouth
  6. A buildup of pus between teeth and gums
  7. Loose teeth or teeth that are drifting apart

 
Taking control of your oral health can help you manage or prevent diabetes. In addition to following our tips, regular conversations with your dentist about your overall health and symptoms can help them provide the best care for your future. If you’re diabetic or experiencing any of these symptoms, we’re always just a phone call away!

Blue heart painted on blank background with thick strokes

We Love Dental Hygiene

Every year for National Dental Hygiene Month, dentists around the country remind their patients to floss and post a bunch of boring tips on social media. Rather than contributing to the noise, we decided to focus on our dental hygienists. After all, they’re the dental hygiene experts!

We asked our hygienists to share something about themselves that makes them unique. And a few people surprised us with their responses! We have a part-time psychic, a dog hygienist, a few world travelers and even someone who races motorbikes!

Read all about our hygienists below. And if you’d like to meet any of them, give us a call to make an appointment today!

 

Heather #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Heather

I have been a dental hygienist for 16 years. Aside from dentistry and caring for my patients’ oral health, my other passions include traveling the world and learning about therapeutic massage. This photo was from a trip to Thailand where I had the opportunity to not only experience a very beautiful part of the world, but also study Thai massage.

 

Amanda #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Amanda

I’ve been practicing dental hygiene for 12 years. I also have a passion for raising awareness for premature birth and the health risk for pregnant women with periodontal disease. Our family loves to support the March of Dimes Kentuckiana to give back for all the support they showed us on our 10-week journey in the NICU.

 

Andrea #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Andrea

Hi, my name’s Andrea and dental hygiene is just one of my passions. I’m a member of Toastmasters International – a group that promotes leadership, communication, and community involvement. Through Toastmasters, I’ve been able to promote oral health in non traditional ways and meet many great people.

 

Whitney #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Whitney

I’m a new hygiene graduate from the University of Louisville. My husband introduced me to a new hobby called MotoTrials. When I’m not practicing hygiene, I’m competing and spending time with my 5-year-old daughter. We travel a lot with this sport and even had the opportunity to go to Spain this year!

 

Jessica #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Jessica

Jessica is not just a Dental Hygienist at our New Albany office – she’s also an actress and psychic medium! Jessica has acted at Kentucky Center for the Arts and recently starred in Sordid Lives by Pandora Productions.

 

LaTosha #WeLoveDentalHygiene

LaTosha

I have been a dental hygienist for 12 years! I am a kid at heart and a thrill seeker. I stay physically active by going to the gym and playing softball. I like roller coasters, zip lining and other adventurous activities. But most importantly I love sharing those experiences with my family and friends.

Lynnetta #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Lynnetta

Hi, my name’s Lynnetta and I’ve been practicing dental hygiene for 36 years, 30 of those with Dr. Robert Fuchs. A passion of mine is baking and decorating cakes. I love bringing treats to my Audubon family. The best part of being a hygienist are the relationships I develop with my patients, some whom are 3rd generation. It also allows me time to travel to NYC to see my grandson, Jonah, and his soon to be little sister!

 

Kristie #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Kristie

My name is Kristie and I’ve been a practicing dental hygienist for 13 years. I play music and sing, and I have a huge soft spot for animals. I’m a health and fitness enthusiast, but traveling the world with my husband is currently my biggest passion. I guess you could say I’m all over the map.

Dana #WeLoveDentalHygieneDana

I have been a dental hygienist for 44 years. I love dogs and in 1996 I taught myself how to clean teeth without sedation. In 2011 I moved to Asheville and got a job at the Animal Hospital of North Asheville doing their non-anesthetic dentals.

 

Nicki #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Nicki

My passion for helping people extends well beyond their teeth. I’ve co-founded a non-profit called David’s Hope that supports people and their families that have been affected by addiction and PTSD. This work has led me to pursue a degree in nursing so that I can continue working daily with those in recovery. This is one of my favorite photos of my brother, my mom, and myself about a year before he lost his battle with addiction.

 

Amber #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Amber

I have been practicing dental hygiene for four years. Dental hygiene has been my dream career since I was 12 years old! When I’m not on the clock, I enjoy anything that involves coffee, spending time with my pug and trying new things.

 

Rachel #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Rachel

I’ve been a hygienist since 2014. Like most little girls, I’ve LOVED horses for as long as I can remember and started riding when I was 8 years old. I competed as a teenager and young adult in Hunter Jumper, paying my way by working at the stables I rode at. Today I enjoy simple trail rides with my trusty girl Chloe. And I’m also lucky enough to share my passion with my daughter, who loves to ride with me on her pony Lacey. This picture was taken at a benefit ride for children battling cancer.

 

Olivia #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Olivia

I have been a practicing dental hygienist since 2012 with a large passion for cycling. Endurance mountain bike racing is my passion outside of the mouth. I love the sweat, the mental challenge, and the skill that comes along with this sport.

 

Renee #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Renee

I’m Renee Hamilton and I’ve been a hygienist for over 13 years. It’s a passion of mine to help others have a healthy smile by educating them to the best of my ability. Another passion I have is skincare and I’ve been a Nerium brand partner about 4 years. My husband I have 3 beautiful children, Trace (8), Dayne (5) and Mollie (1), and they are my “WHY” for every single thing I do.

 

Diane #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Diane

Hi, my name’s Diane and I’m a dental hygienist in Maineville, Ohio. I have three sons and four grandsons. Yep, that equals seven boys! Travel has always been another remarkable part of my life. Over the years, my travels have taken me to forty-nine American States and over ten foreign countries.

 

Amanda #WeLoveDentalHygiene

Amanda

I’ve practiced dental hygiene for 16 years and been in dentistry for 21. When I’m not in the dental office, my passion is traveling! I love seeing new countries and experiencing new cultures. This is a pic of me in Edinburgh a few weeks ago – my second time there!!

Halloween celebration concept with candy corn and jack o lantern cup on wooden table.

The Worst Halloween Candy For Your Teeth

Binge-eating a pillowcase full of peanut butter cups and candy corn while you’re dressed as Wonder Woman is kind of the point of Halloween, isn’t it? But we all know that candy isn’t the healthiest snack on the block – even if you promise to brush and floss when you finally finish stuffing your face.

Sadly, the only candy out there that doesn’t contribute to tooth decay and cavities is probably sugar-free gum. But you’re not knocking on your neighbors’ doors in search of chewing gum, are you? Learn more about the negative effects your favorite candy can have on your teeth or—if you’re impatient—scroll to the bottom of the page to find out the worst!

Closeup of chocolate,peanut and caramel bar isolated on white with clipping path

Chocolate

Examples: Hershey Bar, 3 Musketeers, M&Ms & Peanut Butter Cups

If you’re a chocoholic, you’re in luck. As long as you’re eating a simple bar of chocolate without caramel or many other ingredients, you’re getting a snack that will wash off your teeth fairly easily. Chocolate, especially dark chocolate, even has some health benefits! It’s an iron-packed source of antioxidants that may improve blood flow, lower blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular disease, and improve brain function.

Chocolate is probably the best candy for your teeth. But remember, moderation is the goal here. Too much of anything is bad for you.

Sour candy isolated on a white background

Sour Candy

Examples: Sour Patch Kids, Warheads, SweeTarts & Pixie Stix

Sour candy has a higher acidic content than other types of candy. It’s probably no surprise to you, but eating something like Pixie Stix–which are nothing more than flavored sugar you don’t even have to chew–doesn’t provide any nutritional value and can lead to cavities in addition to blood sugar issues.

If you’re going to indulge with sour candies, try rinsing with a glass of water afterward to wash away the cavity-causing acidity contained in these mouth-puckering bites.

Lollipops in a variety of colors isolated on a white background

Hard Candy

Examples: Jolly Ranchers, Runts, Lemon Heads & Lifesavers

Hard candy like lollipops and jawbreakers is just as bad for you as sour candy, and for many of the same reasons. Because we often suck on hard candy to get it to dissolve, it is in our mouths much longer than other Halloween candy. This just leaves more time for sugars to attack and break down tooth enamel.

If hard candy is a habit for you, we don’t have a lot of good news to share. Try switching to sugar-free gum when you get that urge. And of course remember to rinse after you’re finished with hard candy, even if it’s just tap water.

Gummy bears

Gummy and Chewy Candies

Examples: Gummy Bears, Swedish Fish, Bit-O-Honey & Mary Janes

Like we mentioned above, about the only candy you really want to be chewing on is sugar-free gum. The mixture of sugar and gelatin in gummy bears and worms is very acidic and will wear down tooth enamel, which can lead to exposed nerves and sensitive teeth.

Hey. We love Haribo Gold Bears just as much as the next person, but let’s try and limit ourselves to one bag a week. We can live with that, right? Hopefully. Maybe. Let’s just say we’ll give it a shot.

Saltwater taffy on a white backgroundTaffy or Caramel

Examples: Caramel Chews, Saltwater Taffy & Riesen

The worst halloween candy for your teeth is a tie between taffy and caramel. These bite-sized, sticky morsels of pure sugar get trapped in the grooves of your teeth and are more difficult to rinse away with salvia or water than the average candy. When sugar like what’s inside taffy or caramel gets stuck to teeth, it creates excess bacteria in your mouth which allows acids to thrive and develop into tooth decay. Caramel also contains small amounts of saturated fat, which increases your risk of heart disease.

The worst part of very sticky Halloween candies is that they can pull out fillings, bridges or braces! If you’ve got an orthodontic appliance or fillings, it is best to just stay away entirely.

 

Plus size women jogging and exercising at the park and walking outdoor in the city streets in Chicago, United States - USA. Weight loss concept

Walk for Women’s Health & Fitness Day

The last Wednesday in September is National Women’s Health & Fitness Day, a day that encourages women to take control of their health, make healthy choices and engage in regular physical activity. This year’s theme is: “Fitness…It’s a Smart Choice for Life!”

In addition to eating right, drinking enough water and getting regular checkups, studies show that getting just 150 minutes of exercise per week could add an extra 3.4 years to your life! Women’s Health & Fitness Day is the perfect chance for us to get up, get moving and get started on our health and fitness goals.

What are the health benefits of walking?

Hippocrates famously said “Walking is the best medicine.”

And believe it or not, walking might be healthier than running. Walking briskly can lower your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes as much as running – and it doesn’t put as much wear and tear on your knees and hips.

Walking also eases back pain, lowers stress and protects against dementia, osteoporosis and depression.

How long should I walk?

How long you should walk probably depends on your current level of fitness. A lot of people go by the 10,000 steps rule which amounts to roughly five miles – but that sounds a little scary to anyone just getting started! We recommend taking a walk in the morning, during your lunch break or after work, because these are great times of day to clear your mind and destress.

If you haven’t exercised in a while, try walking for five minutes, taking a break and going for another five. Research shows that doing anything physically active is infinitely better than doing nothing. So if you only make it five minutes, don’t beat yourself up – you’re doing great.

Need more help getting started?

We know it’s easier said than done. So if you’re nervous about getting started on the right foot, try sharing this post with a friend and inviting her to walk with you! Remember that health and fitness isn’t all or nothing – it’s step by step. So set a reachable goal just for today. And worry about tomorrow tomorrow.

If you’re looking for a little extra motivation, check out some of the materials we’ve gathered for you below.

Make Activity Part of Your Lifestyle - Oregon State University

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